FormulaE-2

Oil Price Uncertainty: $35 To $93 For December 2017?

lweb.es/f2613 02.10.2017

iconThe EIA forecasts Brent prices to average $53 a barrel in 2017 and $56/b in 2018, with WTI $1/b less than Brent in both 2017 and 2018. However, “The current values of futures and options contracts suggest high uncertainty in the price outlook. For example, EIA’s forecast for the average WTI price in December 2017 of $53/b should be considered in the context of NYMEX contract values for December 2017 delivery. Contracts traded during the five-day period ending January 5 suggest the market expects WTI prices could range from $35/b to $93/b (…) in December 2017.”

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Saudi Oil Minister: Further Cuts? “If Needed, Absolutely.”

lweb.es/f2586 01.22.2017

iconSome 1.5 million of an agreed upon 1.8 million barrels per day of oil has been taken out of the market in January, Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih said. He noted, however, that at the same time shale oil is estimated to grow this year at 200,000 to 300,000 barrels per day – not at the 500,000 bpd estimated by the International Energy Agency. Al-Falih indicated that OPEC countries could cut oil production again this year if higher prices were not maintained due to reasons beyond the control of producers, including falling demand.

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EIA Energy Outlook: The U.S. To Become Net Energy Exporter

lweb.es/f2532 01.08.2017

iconThe International Energy Agency’s Annual Energy Outlook provides modeled projections of U.S. domestic energy markets through 2050, and includes scenarios with different assumptions of macroeconomic growth, world oil prices, technological progress, and energy policies. With strong domestic production and relatively flat demand, the United States becomes a net energy exporter in most Outlook cases as petroleum liquid imports fall and natural gas exports rise over the projection period under consideration. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions decline in most of the cases, with the highest emissions projected in the “no Clean Power Plan” projection.

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President Trump’s Energy Plan

lweb.es/f2585 01.20.2017

iconWhile the plan lacks specifics about implementation, it lays out a foundation for US energy policy for at least the next four years: “Energy is an essential part of American life and a staple of the world economy. The Trump Administration is committed to energy policies that lower costs for hardworking Americans and maximize the use of American resources, freeing us from dependence on foreign oil.” Highlights are: Eliminating “harmful and unnecessary policies such as the Climate Action Plan”; Embracing US shale and gas; Having a commitment to clean coal technology; Eliminating US dependence on OPEC; Protecting the environment.

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Oil And Gas Sector Vulnerable To Cyberattacks

lweb.es/f2584 01.19.2017

iconCritical U.S. infrastructure, including oil and gas pipelines, is vulnerable to cyberattacks. Because no major breaches have recently been announced, the topic of cybersecurity in the oil and gas space has been quiet. That doesn’t mean that the threat of cyberattacks has gone away, Ken Talanian from Evercore said. The Saudi Aramco hack in 2012 – when an unleashed virus erased data from three-quarters of Aramco’s corporate personal computers – would have served as a wakeup call for the industry if the Stuxnet attack in 2010 on an Iranian nuclear facility didn’t.

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Woodmac: Global Upstream Projects To Double In 2017

lweb.es/f2617 01.17.2017

iconAccording to Wood Mackenzie, final investment decisions are expected to double globally in 2017, rising to more than twenty in 2017 compared with just nine in 2016, while exploration and production spending will increase for the first time since 2014. Woodmac sees confidence beginning to return to the industry, with E&P spending up 3% to $450 billion and with costs expected to decline marginally. US Lower 48 spending is set to rise 23% to $61 billion, with upside if oil prices rise markedly and US independents are emboldened by a Trump presidency.

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China’s Oil Production Drop Helps OPEC Cut Global Supply

lweb.es/f2609 01.17.2017

iconChina’s production is forecast to fall by as much as 7 percent this year, extending a record decline in 2016. This is about the same size as the recent output cut agreed by OPEC member Iraq. China’s output slumped in 2016 as state-owned firms shut wells at mature fields that had become too costly to operate after the crash. Crude production fell 6.9 percent in the first 11 months of 2016 to about 4 million barrels a day, the first decline since 2009 and the biggest in data going back to 1990.

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China’s CNPC Forecasts Record Oil Demand

lweb.es/f2615 01.12.2017

iconChina’s crude oil demand will grow by 3.4 percent this year to a record of 11.8 million barrels per day, according to a China National Petroleum Corporation forecast. Total refinery throughput will rise by 3.3 percent to 11.2 million bpd, with refiners adding 702,000 bpd of net capacity. This rising refinery demand will lift crude imports by 5.3 percent to 7.95 million bpd. CNPC predicted that net exports of diesel will surge by 55 percent this year to about 450,000 bpd.

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Total Plans US$ 1 Billion Annual investments In Brazil

lweb.es/f2523 12.28.2016

iconThe decision by Total E&P do Brasil to expand operations in Brazil with annual investments of US$1 billion comes on the heels of Total agreeing to acquire assets from Petrobras as part of the latter company’s asset sales program. Technical cooperation will be strongly reinforced between the two companies including joint assessment of the exploration potential in key prospective areas in Brazil, and the development of new technologies. Total will also enter the integrated gas and power market in Brazil. Petrobras and Total jointly participate in 19 E&P consortiums worldwide.

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Spectre Haunts OPEC Deal: How Fast Will U.S.Shale Come Back?

lweb.es/f2501 12.26.2016

iconAfter the biggest oil-market deal in a decade, OPEC faces a new balancing act in 2017: boosting prices without igniting shale. But the biggest threat to OPEC’s plan could come from within: if Nigeria and Libya were to reach their potential next year, then their additional barrels would almost wipe out OPEC’s supply cuts; and Iran could be making up for several years of sanctions. Another challenge could come from the now leaner and more efficient U.S. drillers – a bigger boost in prices could mean a million-barrel shale surge.

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